Think Direct Mail is Too Old School for Your School? Think Again.

Don’t let the fact that direct mail has been around for so long fool you. The art of direct mail isn’t what it once was. Direct mail can be incredibly dynamic, and as we know it, it is being reinvented, becoming more personalized, interactive, and effective than ever before.

The team at Today’s Campus recently gave me the opportunity to write and publish an article about direct mail as we know it. If you haven’t had a chance to read the article, you can find it here. And if you want the highlights, here you go…

Direct mail is a survivor. While other lead generation vehicles have either come and gone, or been called into question, direct mail, when done the right way, has remained a steady staple that produces results.

• Targeting:
With direct mail, you know ahead of time who you are targeting. Where interactive lead generation can score leads as they come to you, direct mail does the scoring and modeling before it goes out the door, thus eliminating waste.

• Personalizing:
Through multivariate printing, you can customize your creative, from images to copy, for each and every prospect.

• Interacting:
By adding customized SMS keywords, QR codes, and links to mobile landing pages, you can inspire action from prospects who might otherwise not respond.

• Remarketing:
Connecting with past prospects through direct mail engages these potential students in ongoing communications where you can create new messages, drive interactivity and build brand awareness.

• Converting:
Because you pre-select who receives your direct mail offer and message, there is often less waste, better quality leads, and higher conversions.

Direct mail has not only stood the test of time, it has evolved over time. Through the interplay of print, mobile and personalization, direct mail can produce extraordinary results. It is far from an old school strategy.

Steve Winchester

Steve is the CMO at Helix Education. He has been an advertising account executive for more than 20 years. Steve received his BS from the University of Utah.